Tips for Managers

Should you praise publicly or privately?

February 26, 2020
Here are some guidelines to help you make your decision.

Go easy on young workers’ ideas

February 26, 2020
Your younger workers will sometimes offer ideas that really aren’t that good. But you should never shoot down the employees who bring them. Their willingness to take risks is priceless.

Don’t ask workers to do these things

February 26, 2020
You expect a lot from your employees, but you shouldn’t cross certain lines. Here’s a list of things a good manager will never ask his or her employees to do.

Don’t ignore sensitive complaints

February 26, 2020
Investigating a charge of harassment or discrimination at work isn’t simply a matter of protecting employees—although that’s important. You also have a responsibility to protect your organization.

Do you cover these topics with staff?

February 26, 2020
The conversations you have with your employees are essential to good leadership. Build a strong relationship based on communication by addressing these topics on a regular basis.

3 ways to deal with hurtful humor

February 26, 2020
Humor is a vital part of camaraderie in the workplace. But sometimes jokes are at someone else’s expense. If you’re wondering what to do when a joke-teller risks hurting someone to get a laugh, try one of the responses suggested by humor expert David M. Jacobson of Humor Horizons.

Cut off gossip as soon as it starts

February 26, 2020
It’s easy to get caught in gossip, even for managers. You know you should it, but how should you do it? Lori Palatnik and Bob Burg, authors of Gossip, offer three useful options.

Support staff when customers are rude

February 26, 2020
Suppose one of your employees has been unjustly criticized by a customer. Use the situation as a learning experience for the employee, helping him or her review what happened and understand how to prevent it from happening again.

Communication is vital when delegating

February 26, 2020
Management is about getting results through people’s efforts. That means effective communication is essential. Here’s what to do.

Rein in a sarcastic worker

February 14, 2020
Suppose a productive, even-tempered employee makes sarcastic jokes and comments about work in general, his or her job, your organization—everything. Unlike complainers who are also poor workers, this employee’s comments are at odds with his or her competent performance. However, don’t use current results as excuses to ignore the situation.